Squinting

Squinting
Item# a-4

When Cortes and his men first saw a glimpse of Tenochtitlan they couldn't believe their eyes because it was so beautiful. By all accounts, the Templo Mayor was the tallest building. Spanish eyewitnesses who accompanied Cortes tell us of witnessing three days of nonstop human sacrifices at the Templo Mayer. The remains of many of the victims were fed to lions and jaguars as well as some smaller carnivorous animals. Cannibalism was common at the time of the Spanish conquest and human body parts were known to be available in some marketplaces. During the rainy season, it was estimated that Lake Texcoco was shallow in most parts and 40 miles by 100 miles in size. Due to a large population base, space was very limited. This forced many villages to locate on the water using a system of artificial islands call chinampas. This system bunched sticks and mud together which were sometimes anchored by willow trees. The Aztecs connected Tenochtitlan with three causeways. These causeways ran next to dikes that kept the salt water from entering Lake Texcoco. Cortes captured Tenochtitlan after starving the inhabitants into submission. When the Aztecs finally surrendered his men reported that most of the bark had been eaten off of the trees.

Many visitors to Mexico City believe that Teotihuacan had something to do with the Aztecs. It does not. The Aztec capital was Tenochtitlan and remnants of it can still be found in the Zocalo of Mexico City. Cortes destroyed Tenochtitlan.